Research and publications

ViaStrada staff have published many papers, articles, reports and other technical documents, to conferences, national clients, and public media. A number of these publications have won industry awards.

Recent publications are shown below; you are welcome to reference these in your own work. Feel free to contact the relevant authors for further information as well:

This article was published in TranSafe Issue 5 (Apr 2001). It concludes with the following paragraph:

Some roundabout projects which achieve good travel time or efficiency ratings, and can reduce the overall crash rate of an intersection, may make the road environment considerably less safe for some road users, especially cyclists. So while a roundabout may be the most efficient and (for motorists) safest intersection control in a given situation, planners should review whether it is really the best solution to the overall problem. If it is, then special facilities should be investigated for those who are disadvantaged, such as a pedestrian underpass or separate cycleway that avoids the roundabout completely.

In the interest of making this fascinating document on 40 Years of Change, Traffic and Planning 1959-1999 covering the Christchurch City Centre more accessible to a wider audience of peers, citizens, researchers and historians, the team at ViaStrada has scanned in its copy and placed it on this website.

The following is the start of the preface of the report:

This publication records the planning and changes in the Christchurch City Centre, in particular to the transport system, over the 40 years 1959 to 1999. It is both a description and an assessment of the surveys, planning and development of the city centre, i.e. the area within the four avenues. It attempts, in a few pages and with photographs and charts, to encapsulate 40 years of the results of all the Council's decisions and actions, together with those of the many developers, businesses and institutions that occupy the city centre.

A remit was presented at the 2000 Traffic Management Workshop, recommending a number of features to be employed for achieving cycle-friendly intersections.

New Zealand transport practitioners seem to underestimate the potential of the transport modes walking, cycling and public transport and focus mainly on the private motor vehicle. This paper examines possible improvements for these ‘forgotten transport modes' based on European concepts that are applicable for New Zealand conditions. The presentation was a repeat of what had previously been presented at the 1999 ALGENZ conference in Wanganui.

Christchurch City Council has been following a programme of strategic implementation of cycle lanes. A point has been reached where it is essential to review the effectiveness of the various treatments in place. This paper looks at the effect that cycle lanes have on safety.

It was good to see so many professionals presenting remits about cycling issues. This is a very positive development, as there is still a definite need for all of us to learn more about the specific needs of cyclists as road users. We have only just started to learn about it!

New Zealand transport practitioners seem to underestimate the potential of the transport modes walking, cycling and public transport and focus mainly on the private motor vehicle. This paper examines possible improvements for these ‘forgotten transport modes' based on European concepts that are applicable for New Zealand conditions.

The introduction of bicycle lanes in Toronto and other North American cities over recent years marks an important trend. Perhaps for the first time in North America since the invention of the automobile, road space for motor vehicles is being reallocated to bicycles.

The analysis has shown that there is a real problem of insufficient intergreen timings for cyclists. The graphs included support the need for a treatment of the problem, as 3 to 4 seconds of clearance time is missing at wide intersections.

The proposed treatment is to provide two detection loops within the intersection that can detect slow cyclists. The procedure that has been developed for the placement and timing of the loops ensures that slow cyclists will call an all-red time extension, whereas red light runners will practically not be able to learn how to call the extension. A major benefit is that cyclists do not need to adjust their behaviour to the new technology, as the system works automatically for them. Cycle groups have been consulted and have expressed their favour towards the proposal.

The objective of this study is to consider safety aspects of the New Zealand cycling environment.

Cycling is one of the cheapest and most sustainable forms of transport, and for short distances in congested urban areas it is often the fastest. Cycling has strong potential for improving sustainability in urban transport. It is safe in the sense of presenting a low threat to others but dangerous in the sense of vulnerability to risk imposed by others. The major safety problem is sharing space with motor vehicles on roads designed and used with little or no thought for cyclists' needs.