Planning & design for cycling

Industry training courses – cycling

ViaStrada runs a series of training courses to introduce the principles of planning and design for cycling in New Zealand. The courses are aimed at anybody planning, designing or reviewing roads or other facilities used for cycling. This includes planners, general roading engineers and road safety practitioners. Local body politicians, people involved in the health sector and cycling advocates can also attend the courses. To date, over 1200 people have attended fundamental and advanced courses in Planning and Design for Cycling.

All participants receive a set of presentation slides for note taking, and other reference material. Attendee numbers are usually limited to 25 to ensure that there are opportunities for questions and discussion throughout the course. The workshops include lectures, discussions, practical exercises and may include a site visit.

Tim Hughes (Senior Engineer, NZTA) says about these courses: "When I travel around New Zealand, I can see the basic skills taught in this training course being applied to an increasing number of projects". The course, including this quote from Tim Hughes, was profiled in the Land Transport News newsletter (2007, page 6).

Following on from the award winning Fundamentals course, Advanced courses were developed in conjunction with the NZ Transport Agency (NZTA) to lift the industry's performance to the next level of professional competence. The content of the cycling training courses was completely revised and restructured earlier in 2014 and from July 2016 also reflect the introduction of NZTA's Cycling Network Guidance. New training formats, including interactive case-based workshops and online webinars, are being developed for delivery in conjunction with NZTA.

2018 Courses

We would like to hear from anyone who is interested in attending courses in cycle planning and design or an advanced interactive intersection design workshop. To express interest in these offerings, please contact Glen Koorey, indicating preference for training type and preferred location(s).

26/28 November 2018 – Cycle planning/design (Wellington, date TBC)

ViaStrada and NZTA are considering a full-day course in Wellington at the end of Nov 2018. This will cover a wide range of aspects related to general planning and designing for cycling, particularly for those without any formal training in this area. The course will make reference to various new components of the NZTA Cycling Network Guidance. It is aimed at anybody planning, designing or reviewing roads or other facilities that will be used for cycling. This includes planners, road and traffic engineers and managers, road safety practitioners, decision makers and cycling advocates. Course confirmation will be subject to numbers; contact Glen Koorey if you are interested in attending.

6 March 2018 - Advanced intersection design (Auckland)

This interactive workshop was held for Auckland Transport staff and their consultants and focused on advanced intersection design issues, particularly around signalised intersections and roundabouts. Participants received a series of introductory presentations and then work in groups on four real-life Auckland site problems. A further advanced workshop in Auckland is being considered, subject to numbers.

2017 Courses

27 September 2017 – Fundamentals (Auckland)

ViaStrada offered a full-day planning and design for cycling course in Auckland in Sep 2017. This covered a wide range of aspects related to general planning and designing for cycling, particularly for those without any formal training in this area. The course also made reference to various new components of the NZTA Cycling Network Guidance. It is aimed at anybody planning, designing or reviewing roads or other facilities that will be used for cycling. This includes planners, road and traffic engineers and managers, road safety practitioners, decision makers and cycling advocates.

17 October 2017 – Advanced intersection design (Christchurch)

Immediately before the Asia Pacific Cycle Congress in Christchurch (Oct 2017), we held a full-day training course in Advanced cycleway design for intersections. This was an interactive workshop looking at how to incorporate various cycleway styles (protected, on-road painted, shared street) with different intersection styles (signalised, roundabout, priority). For each workshop topic, participants were given a brief overview presentation, a group design exercise to work on, and an opportunity to discuss the findings at the end. This course is aimed at designers tasked with delivering cycleways with intersection treatments; ideally participants will already be familiar with fundamental aspects of simple cycleway design and/or intersection design.

Registration

To register, download the relevant from from the table below.

Course Date City Registration

Fundamentals of planning and design for cycling

Wed 27 Sep 2017 Auckland Course delivered

Advanced cycleway design for intersections

Tue 17 Oct 2017 Christchurch Course delivered
Advanced cycleway design for intersections Tue 6 Mar 2018 Auckland Course delivered
Cycle planning and design Mon 26 or Wed 28 Nov 2018 (TBC) Wellington Subject to course numbers
Interested in future courses? ??? ??? Contact us!

 

 

Cost

Courses cost $650 per day (+GST) early-bird rate. Discounted rates may be available for representatives of volunteer groups.

Target Audiences

Anybody involved in land transport should consider taking these courses, from the new graduate to the engineer with 20+ years experience. The Advanced course follows on from the Fundamentals in three specialised modules relating to planning and funding, mid-block design and intersection design.

Each module is stand alone and the content was significantly revised during 2013-14 to reduce overlap across the four modules. As such, there are no specific prerequisites for attendance on the Advanced modules, and each is aimed at a different target audience. However, attendees of modules 2, 3 and 4 are expected to know and understand some general concepts of traffic engineering and transport planning as it relates to this area. We therefore recommend that you attend Module 1 if you do not already have experience that gives you a similar level of understanding.

If you are unsure, please contact us - we will be happy to talk to you about it.

The target audiences for the four modules are as follows:

Module 1 - Planning and Design for Cycling

The course covers a wide range of introductory aspects related to planning and designing for cycling. It is aimed at anybody planning, designing or reviewing roads or other facilities that will be used by cyclists. This includes planners, road and traffic engineers and managers, road safety practitioners, decision makers and cycling advocates.

Module 2 - Advanced Planning and Funding

This module is primarily targeted at those involved in the higher level, strategic aspects of cycle provision. It will suit general city planners who are interested in providing for cyclists through city and district plan items and traffic planners and cycle planners who are interested in developing cycle networks based on existing data and subsequent demand predictions. Module 2 also covers funding mechanisms and thus will be of use to anyone involved in budgeting or seeking funding assistance for cycle related projects such as managers and decision makers.

At a secondary level, Module 2 will also be of some interest to traffic engineers who would like to gain a greater appreciation of the context of their designs with respect to wider network, strategic and financial implications and cycling advocates who wish to understand the mechanisms with which cycling projects are planned and funded. Given that Module 2 is run over one morning and then followed by Module 3 the same afternoon and Module 4 will often be held the following day, it may well be beneficial for those attending Modules 3 and 4 to also attend Module 2.

Module 3 - Mid-block Design

This module is primarily targeted at traffic engineers involved with designing facilities; as every traffic engineering project should include consideration of cyclists, this includes all traffic engineers, not just those who design cycle facilities. They will also be beneficial for road safety practitioners, especially those involved in cycling projects.

Module 3 will also be of use to cycling advocates to give them a greater appreciation of the technical aspects involved in designing facilities. There is a reasonable amount of technical content that may go beyond the interest or understanding of those not working in the industry. Although not specifically targeted at planners, managers and decision makers, Module 3 will be useful to those involved in higher level planning for cycling by helping them understand the considerations faced by designers.

Module 4 - Intersection Design

Like Module 3, this module is primarily targeted at traffic engineers involved with designing facilities and road safety practitioners.

Module 4 will also be of use to cycling advocates to give them a greater appreciation of the technical aspects involved in designing facilities. There is a reasonable amount of technical content that may go beyond the interest or understanding of those not working in the industry. Although not specifically targeted at planners, managers and decision makers, Module 4 will be useful to those involved in higher level planning for cycling by helping them understand the considerations faced by designers.

Course presenters

Presenters for recent courses were ViaStrada Director Axel Wilke ,Traffic Engineer Megan Fowler, and Senior Traffic Engineer Glen Koorey.  Axel is well-known in New Zealand for his expertise in sustainable transport and especially cycle planning and design. Megan has published and presented several research and technical papers and has particular interest in road safety and sustainable transport. Glen has also presented the course many times in the past and was involved in its original development.

Please do not hesitate to contact Glen (03-928-2541) if you have any enquiries about course content or about whether the course is appropriate for you. 

It is recommended that all participants should complete a half-hour on-road cycle trip (about 10km) in an urban area no more than a month before the course.

Course Evaluation

Since the beginning of 2007, delegates have rated the course as follows:

 

The following quotes are from the course evaluation forms:

"I think this course should be integrated more widely into transportation industry functions /university papers. As an engineer I think that more awareness is required from engineers (and particularly decision-makers), particularly from non-cyclists." - Traffic engineering consultant, Napier course, October 2007

"This course was highly recommended - it certainly lived up to my expectations. Huge amount of information covered - some I didn't need but interesting nonetheless." - Road safety co-ordinator, Napier course, October 2007

"Excellent, thought provoking day. First class!" - RCA planning team leader, Christchurch course, September 2007

"Very informative and is value for money" - RCA engineer, Dunedin course, August 2007

"Could have more on implementation, but was exactly what I was looking for and expecting" - Dunedin course, August 2007

"Great course - very useful" - Cycling advocate, Dunedin course, August 2007

"I would recommend that any Road Safety Coordinator at any stage in their role goes on the course (it is but one day out of the office!), and to urge their engineering and travel planning colleagues to go too." - Road safety coordinator

"Appreciate you guys coming over to the West Coast. Represents start of new thinking." - RCA engineer, Greymouth course, August 2007

"Very useful. A good summary of the field in NZ from beginning to end." - Transit engineer, Auckland 2008

"Thank you for a very well presented introductory course. I appreciated the open discussion and have learnt a lot from your course." - Auckland Transport engineer, May 2012